Live Friends in a Virtual World

I have always been great at meeting people. I greet them, chat with them, get to know them and love them – easy as pie.

At least, it used to feel like that.

The older I become, the more difficult it seems to make meaningful connections. At almost 52 years of age, recently separated from my husband of 28 years, and living in yet another ‘new’ area, I find myself with no one to call when I need a ride home from the car repair shop. Oh, don’t get me wrong, I have at least twenty close friends in my phone list, but the majority of them live at best, two hours away and at worst, in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. Most of my family either live too far from me or are not available in this type of situation. I seriously never had to think about things like this before.

I wonder how much of the problem stems from aging, self-reliance, or the culture in general? I worry that the people my age already have their fill of relationships to maintain, and are left with no time or energy to add me to their list. But perhaps in the interest of independence, I have become so good at doing everything for myself that I have forgotten how to cultivate friends I can call on for help.

Maybe my friendship problem is simply the result of a culture that relies on hashtags and thirty-second video clips for connection, while I pine for the long-lost days of front porch news over iced tea, and the neighborhood kids playing mosquito-ridden games of kick-the-can.

It seemed to be easier to develop deep friendships in college or church, as a parent or military spouse. In those seasons I was surrounded by people like me (shared age, shared values, shared beliefs, or shared circumstances). But if connection is a function of like-mindedness or being in the right place at the right time, what if I never again find anyone else who thinks like me, lives like me, or is as old as me? What if I am no longer able to find the ‘right’ place at the ‘right’ time?

It stands to reason that I have felt this way before. I have lived in nine distinct locations over a 28-year period, for pity’s sake. If memory serves, each major relocation was a struggle when it came to relationships. Every. Damn. Time. This time just feels so much harder.

You would think that after years of practice I would have developed a formula for meeting the person destined to be my next incredible BFF. Sadly, if such a formula exists, I have yet to discover it. I am not even sure I know how it happens in the first place. But remembering the struggle, knowing I have been here before, and at the same time, looking back with amazement on all of the people I am privileged to call ‘friend’, I can well believe that she is working/eating/exercising/living somewhere in the nearby vicinity.

Will we cross paths before my car needs its next tune-up? Only time will tell.

 

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11 thoughts on “Live Friends in a Virtual World

  1. I clicked to direct here from Kelsey Munger’s blog. I am so glad I did. I am in the same situation and hate it… It helps, though, to know someone else struggles with this. Maybe I’m not so crazy after all. LOL

    Thank you for a great post!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. You said, “I’m not even sure how it happens in the first place.” That’s the key right there I think. You can make it happen. It just does. As they say, life is what happens when you’re making other plans.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. It’s easy to say, ‘don’t overthink it’, yet I understand. Don’t necessarily restrict yourself to age groups. One of my BFFs is fifteen years younger than me, another is fifteen years older. Sometimes, time is not important when you think alike. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. This is SO true, Kate! I guess what I meant to convey (and failed at miserably, obviously) is that life situations are often dictated by age bracket, i.e., if someone is taking care of 5 kids, they are likely not going to be spending a lot of time with a recently separated mother of grown children who works full-time…

      Like

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